Save the date: Midvale Main Street Workshop Next Week!

The Midvale City Redevelopment Agency will be hosting a public open house focused on Main Street! Join us:

When: Wednesday February 28, 2018

Time: 5 pm to 7 pm

Where: Midvale City Hall, Dahl Room

Who: Everyone interested in the future of our Main Street

This open house is part of a public planning process intended to produce a “small area plan” for Main Street.

A small area plan is a set of documents that address the goals for a small defined portion of a city such as a neighborhood or street corridor. These documents contain a set of detailed strategies that are chosen to respond to the specific needs of the people, places, and processes in the planning area. These needs are grouped into categories such as transportation, economic development, land use, housing, historic preservation, aesthetics, and many others. The general purpose of a small area plan is to identify and prioritize these needs and to develop practical strategies that can be implemented to guide future decisions in order to meet specific goals.

HOW IS A SMALL AREA PLAN MADE?

Small area plans are made through a collaborative process between stakeholders, city officials, and planning consultants. The term ‘stakeholder’ refers to the people and organizations that have an interest or investment in the area such as local residents, business owners, institutions, and property owners. This community of stakeholders comes together to discuss their needs and goals with city officials and planning consultants. Then those city officials and planning consultants configure the community needs and goals within the legal, economic, physical, and political framework of the planning area to produce the Small Area Plan, a set of documents that outline when and how the needs and goals will be addressed.

WHY DOES MAIN STREET NEED A SMALL AREA PLAN?

Midvale’s Main Street needs a small area plan because the area is changing and the city wants to make sure that those changes are positive for the neighborhood and address the needs and goals of the community. Many of the changes affecting the Main Street area are a result of the large adjacent Bingham Junction development which has brought substantial numbers of new residents and businesses to the city. There are also many opportunities for improving Main Street such as empty buildings and vacant lots which are available for new businesses and buildings that can reinvigorate the area. There is already momentum for positive change along Main Street with the addition of seven new buildings since 2001, including the new city hall complex, senior center, and business offices. The Main Street area can benefit from a small area plan that helps to guide and sustain this momentum in a way that addresses recent changes and community goals.

How Quilts Revived an Ailing Main Street

Many people in Midvale see the potential our historic Main Street has. Unfortunately, Main Street is populated by a few successful business, surrounded by vacant storefronts and a few vacant lots. How can we revive our Main Street?

Sometimes, the simpler the idea, the more successful it can be. One town in Missouri was revived in part by a small start-up quilt company! While quilts aren’t the answer for every Main Street in need of revitalization, this example points to the importance of local businesses, and the long-lasting effects they can have.

From NPR, original article by Frank Morris/KCUR:

“Just a few years ago, downtown Hamilton, Mo., looked a lot like a thousand other forgotten, rural towns. Abandoned, forlorn buildings marred the main drag.

But in recent years, an explosively fast-growing startup business in rural north western Missouri has shaken up a staid industry, producing a YouTube star and revitalizing a town with a proud retail history.

That’s why Dean Hales, who has lived here 77 years, is so delighted now.

“I’ve lived here most all my life, I can’t hardly believe what I’m seeing,” he says. “When you’ve got people coming from all over the world to a little town of 1,800 people, you’ve got something pretty special. And we do have.”

They’ve got Missouri Star Quilt Co. Just seven years after its launch, 15 freshly remodeled buildings in Hamilton now house fabric, sewing machines and customers.”

Della Badger drove here from Victorville, Calif.

“I just looked on my map and asked Siri, ‘How do I get to Hamilton, Mo.?’ ” she says. “But, it was my dream to get here and see Jenny.”

Badger’s talking about someone she knew only through YouTube, Jenny Doan, of Missouri Star Quilt Co.

 (Jenny Doan sits with her daughter Sarah Galbraith, who co-founded Missouri Star Quilt Co., outside two of the new restaurants the company bankrolled in downtown Hamilton, Mo.
Frank Morris/KCUR)

Doan’s how-to quilting videos have drawn millions of views.

“It’s some crazy thing like that,” Doan says, laughing. “I can’t hardly use the bathroom in a restaurant without somebody saying, ‘I love your tutorials!’ ”

Jenny Doan’s DIY quilt tutorials have drawn more than 50 million views.

Doan says it’s because she takes an easygoing approach to what traditionally has been a daunting and tedious craft.

“Quilting has always been something that’s like, for the elite,” she says. “It’s kind of a hard thing to do, you know; everything has to be cut perfectly. And I’m like, ‘Just whack it up, we’re going to put it together, this is going to be awesome!’ ”

She says women from around the world visit Hamilton, or write to thank her for getting them into quilting.

“This has absolutely been the sweetest, most serendipitous thing that has ever happened to me,” Doan adds.

And this business would not have happened if she had been a better financial planner.

“My parents have always been bad with money,” says Alan Doan, Jenny’s son.

He says the recession cost his folks most of their savings, and threatened to take their house.

“Me and my sister were looking at it and said, ‘We’ve got to put something together, so that mom can make a little extra cash,’ ” Alan says.

So in the fall of 2008, Alan and his sister took out loans and set their mom up with a business sewing other people’s quilts together. Customers kept asking for fabric, so Alan built a website to sell it.

“World, we’re open! And you expect somebody to care, right? And so we launched the website,” Alan says. “I still have my Facebook post, I went and looked at it the other day, it’s like, ‘Hey I launched this quilt shop for mom, you guys should check it out.’ It’s [got] like, two likes.”

Doan was selling, or trying to sell, a relatively new product: pre-cut fabric. The pieces come bundled together from the factory in a pack with different, complementary prints, making it much easier and faster to make good-looking quilts.

But one year in, business was terrible.

Jenny says, “Alan came to me and said, ‘Mom, are you interested in doing tutorials?’ I said, ‘Sure honey, what’s a tutorial?’ I mean, I had no idea. I had never been on YouTube.’ ”

Well, the videos, featuring pre-cut fabrics eventually took off. Sales exploded and now Missouri Star Quilt employs more than 180 people to sew, staff stores and, like Mindy Lloyd, ship thousands of packages a day from the company’s huge new warehouse.

“This one’s going to Australia,” Lloyd says. “Isn’t that neat?”

Alan’s savvy helped build the foundation of a large business.

“We had to learn how to do this from like watching YouTube videos on how Amazon does it, or something, right? We built this warehouse, and I just called all the smart people I knew and said, ‘How do we do this?’ ” he says.

Success has pushed the company into publishing, even food service. They’re renovating more buildings and by midsummer they plan to double the number of quilt shops in Hamilton, and even add a “man’s land” to give their customers’ husbands something to do.

The Doans aren’t the first people from Hamilton to make it big in retail.

(image from Frank Morris/KCUR )

 James Cash Penney Jr. landed his first sales job here almost 120 years ago. Penney left Hamilton as a teenager, but came back years later and opened his 500th J.C. Penney store here.

It’s not likely the Missouri Star Quilt Co. can match that, but it has so far transformed this once sleepy little town into a quilting mecca.

 

Original Article here: https://www.npr.org/2015/05/21/408452759/one-family-revitalizes-a-small-town-with-yes-quilts

Feb 28 Public Open House: Main Street in Focus

The Midvale City Redevelopment Agency will be hosting a public open house focused on Main Street! Join us:

When: Wednesday February 28, 2018

Time: 5 pm to 7 pm

Where: Midvale City Hall, Dahl Room

Who: Everyone interested in the future of our Main Street

This open house is part of a public planning process intended to produce a “small area plan” for Main Street.

A small area plan is a set of documents that address the goals for a small defined portion of a city such as a neighborhood or street corridor. These documents contain a set of detailed strategies that are chosen to respond to the specific needs of the people, places, and processes in the planning area. These needs are grouped into categories such as transportation, economic development, land use, housing, historic preservation, aesthetics, and many others. The general purpose of a small area plan is to identify and prioritize these needs and to develop practical strategies that can be implemented to guide future decisions in order to meet specific goals.

HOW IS A SMALL AREA PLAN MADE?

Small area plans are made through a collaborative process between stakeholders, city officials, and planning consultants. The term ‘stakeholder’ refers to the people and organizations that have an interest or investment in the area such as local residents, business owners, institutions, and property owners. This community of stakeholders comes together to discuss their needs and goals with city officials and planning consultants. Then those city officials and planning consultants configure the community needs and goals within the legal, economic, physical, and political framework of the planning area to produce the Small Area Plan, a set of documents that outline when and how the needs and goals will be addressed.

WHY DOES MAIN STREET NEED A SMALL AREA PLAN?

Midvale’s Main Street needs a small area plan because the area is changing and the city wants to make sure that those changes are positive for the neighborhood and address the needs and goals of the community. Many of the changes affecting the Main Street area are a result of the large adjacent Bingham Junction development which has brought substantial numbers of new residents and businesses to the city. There are also many opportunities for improving Main Street such as empty buildings and vacant lots which are available for new businesses and buildings that can reinvigorate the area. There is already momentum for positive change along Main Street with the addition of seven new buildings since 2001, including the new city hall complex, senior center, and business offices. The Main Street area can benefit from a small area plan that helps to guide and sustain this momentum in a way that addresses recent changes and community goals.

Midvale’s Redevelopment Agency & A New Focus on Main Street

The Midvale Redevelopment Agency is a department within Midvale City that focuses on neighborhood revitalization.  Through the Agency, the City is able to fund neighborhood improvements and incentivize private investment in specifically designated parts of Midvale.  Currently these designated areas include the Jordan Bluff’s Project Area and the highly successful Bingham Junction Project Area.

In 2018, the Agency will focus its efforts on the stabilization, preservation, and revitalization of Midvale’s Historic Main Street and its surrounding neighborhoods.  This effort will begin with the preparation of a small area plan.   The small area planning process will include significant public engagement, and have the goal of establishing policies and programs that will support Main St. once again becoming an active and vibrant business, arts, and cultural center in Midvale.

The schedule of upcoming public events will be included on the Agency’s website: http://www.midvalecity.org/departments/community-development/redevelopment-agency

For further information about the Agency or Midvale’s Historic Main St., please contact Matt Dahl at 801-567-7262 or at mdahl@midvale.com

Why Historic Preservation on Midvale Main Street?

There are currently more than 50 buildings along Midvale’s Main Street, on the blocks north of Center Street. Most of these buildings are quite old,with 73% of them built before World War 2 and the oldest built in 1901. There was a lull in construction on Main Street during the 45 years between 1955 and 2000 with only one building remaining from that period. Building activity has picked up since then with seven new buildings since 2001, the newest being the Senior Citizens Center and the City Hall/Justice Court complex, completed in 2014. This recent momentum for Main Street reinvestment is encouraging, but what can be done with so many historic buildings?

There are many reasons to preserve old buildings, especially on a historic Main Street. Old buildings are made out of durable construction materials and with finer craftsmanship than most modern buildings. The old growth forests and hardwoods that fueled the construction boom before World War 2 are now very rare or no longer exist. People and businesses are attracted to old buildings. The warmth of the materials, classic architectural elements, and unique spaces and styles provide cozy familiar places that patrons prefer in non-chain stores like bookstores, barber shops, restaurants, and even start-up shops. These old buildings tell the long and unique story of Midvale’s Main Street and simply cannot be replaced once they are demolished.

What does it take to preserve historic buildings? It all depends on how each building was built and how well it has been maintained over the years. The more expensive preservation efforts include reinforcing the building’s structure and updating its plumbing, electrical, and heating/cooling systems. Less expensive efforts include updating fixtures and finish materials like wall coverings, flooring, and windows. Sometimes these modernization activities reveal hidden treasures such as ornamental woodwork and glass work that has been covered over for decades. The condition of the historic buildings on Main Street vary from building to building so the cost of preserving them will vary as well. Reinvestment into these beautiful old buildings can modernize them to meet the needs of future tenants and preserve them as part of Midvale’s historic Main Street for all to enjoy.

References: Salt Lake County Assessor, National Trust for Historic Preservation

Midvale Main Street Survey!

We want to hear from you! What parts of Midvale Main Street do you think need support? What kinds of improvements could be made? Follow this link to take a brief 20-question survey on your thoughts on how Midvale’s Main Street could be revitalized! This survey will be “live” until April 2018. Please share with anyone that might be interested!

 

 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MidvaleMain

Main Street Theatre

2018 marks the Main Street Theatre’s ten-year anniversary. Before the theater was purchased by Tammy Ross in 2008, it had most recently featured a series of comedy clubs and improv groups. Ross and her family purchased the theater due to the historic character of the theater, and the potential she saw in the Main Street area.

The theater is widely known by theater goers and actors throughout the valley as being one of the only theaters that puts on un-edited productions. Ross is proud of this, as it gives Utah residents a variety of options in what kind of theater they attend.

The Main Street Theatre puts on between five to six shows a year including two children’s productions. A children’s production of The Little Mermaid just wrapped in November. Upcoming 2018 shows so far include Spelling Bee (January 11-20) and Spring Awakening (February 22- March 10).

Please visit Midvaletheatre.com or facebook.com/midvalemainstreettheatre for more information and show times.

The Streets of Main

Many longtime Midvale residents may remember the businesses that have occupied Main Street over the years, but few may recall how the streets got their names. While many roads around Main Street have changed course over the last 100 years, such as Holden Street, or even been renamed or eliminated, the Main Street area still has a few streets that have maintained the same course and their original name since Midvale was founded.

Holden Street which borders the Main Street area once followed a straight North to south course. Now as we know, Holden Street joins with 700 W to the north and becomes Holden Street again near Midvale City Hall. Smelter Street once ran from Main Street across Holden to the smelter offices, when the Midvale smelter was still in business. Today, Smelter Street runs from Holden to Main Street and offers visitors great access via car or foot.  A similar story is shared by Depot Street. It has been suggested that Depot Street’s terminus was once the Midvale train depot. Today, Depot street ends at Holden Street as well.

 

While streets may seem like minor parts of a downtown area, if you look back far enough they too can tell a story of the past.

Welcome to Midvale Main Street!

Midvale’s Main Street is the historic center of Midvale City, located in the heart of Salt Lake County, Utah.

Main Street has a long history of vibrant businesses, arts, and culture. In the next few years, a new wave of investment in Main Street will bring more people to live and work in the heart of our city.

This investment is intended to:

  • attract private capital investment
  • contribute to the tax base
  • create jobs
  • preserve historic Main Street buildings
  • contribute to the economic vitality and prosperity of Midvale City
  • generate jobs
  • revitalize the Main Street business district
  • increase housing quality and affordability

Join our community as we look forward to new and exciting things on Main Street in the heart of Midvale!